Tag Archives: workshop

Förderfähig! Workshop

Empowerment workshop for artists and cultural workers with disabilities run together with Diversity.Arts.Culture.

About the workshop:

In this workshop we get an overview of funding and funding opportunities for Berlin artists. We discuss the particular difficulties faced by people with disabilities when applying for funding. How does an application process work? We go through an application step by step.

This workshop is aimed at disabled artists and cultural professionals who want to work professionally but need more information. It is intended to encourage artists to establish themselves on the regular art market. At the end of the workshop there is the opportunity to network and continue to exchange ideas.

Speakers: Imke Baumann (conveyor e.v.), Tobias Losekandt (culture support point)

Moderators: Jovana Komnenic and Dirk Sorge (Berlinklusion)

When and where:

25 October 2018
10-2pm
aquarium, Skalitzer Straße 6, 10999 Berlin

Accessibility:
Language The workshop will be held in German language. There is an interpretation in German Sign Language (DGS).
The workshop room in the aquarium is accessible at ground level and barrier-free. Wheelchair accessible toilets are available.
Empowerment workshop for disabled artists and artists

Common Bond

Common Bond was an international collaboration project between myself, and photographers Rosita McKenzie (Edinburgh) and Jan Bölsche (Berlin). Common Bond followed on from the success of CAE’s previous project Through the Looking Glass, Dimly developed by myself, Rosita and Australian based photographer Andrew Follows, which saw Rosita McKenzie develop a body of work in response to Andrew’s work and encouraged a peer-mentoring relationship between the two artists during Andrew Follows Edinburgh residency. Where Through the Looking Glass saw Rosita take on the role of “host artist”, the Common Bond residency allowed Rosita to become the “visiting artist” and pursue a new peer-mentoring relationship with Berlin based photographer Jan Bölsche.

The initial project was developed in partnership over a year featuring a 2-week artist residency programme, a series of photo-shoot sessions in selected locations around the city; meetings and studio visits with Berlin based artists and photographers; a practical photography workshop led by Rosita and Jan for both sighted and non-sighted participants; and a public discussion group on the theme of normality, ableism and genetic engineering in September 2013.

Central to the residency was Rosita’s development of a new body of work in response to the concept of the “common bonds” between Britain and Germany. Rosita’s investigation of the city from an historical and cultural heritage perspective, interprets this visually rich city from her perspective as a blind person.

The residency enabled Rosita to forge new international connections with other artists and audiences and gave her an opportunity to help  people with disabilities participate within contemporary art despite geographic and language barriers. Building on from her previous projects such as the Sight Unseen group exhibition in California, the residency has strengthened links between blind photographers Berlin and in Scotland.

The project continued with Jan, Rosita and myself developing and delivering further Blind Photography Workshops in other cities, exhibitions and the establishment of an international network of blind photographers.

Photos and further information can be found here.

A Collaboration

Kirstin Broussard's work with The Museum of Modern Art’s Community and Access education team and their collaboration with PS77, a public school in Brooklyn NY for middle and high school aged students diagnosed on the autism spectrum.For over ten years I’ve had the pleasure of partnering with Amie Robinson, the art teacher at PS77 in Brooklyn New York and her students as part of The Museum of Modern Art’s Community and Access education team. (PS77 is a public school in Brooklyn NY for middle and high school aged students diagnosed on the autism spectrum.)

Though every single year we have partnered has been a revelation, I’d like to highlight 2015:

For this seven week program we focused on two exhibitions about artists who use their studio space as an integral part of their art-making practice- their studios become the ground for a kind of “world” they create and inhabit. In particular we focused on Matisse’s cut-paper collages which filled the walls of his home in Nice, and the work of a contemporary artist Daniel Gordon, who makes life size, three dimensional collages out of found images.

A number of things happened as a result of our encounters at MoMA: the students were now familiar with the idea of a kind of “manipulated” reality- they had explored images that transform everyday objects into something surreal and expressive, there was a spirit of play and experimentation in the air rooted in something familiar, personal and communal. Back at the school we collectively decided to build a life size, three dimensional kitchen still life from found images:

  • Three classes participated in the construction of the final art piece; every student participated in both the conception and creation of the project individually and at times communally, it spread across their school day and involved their classroom teacher, their computer teacher and their art teacher.
  • Every one of our sessions built upon previous investigations as we moved from the concrete to the abstract.
  • When the kitchen still life was complete, we lit it with studio lights, set up a camera and a tripod, and invited the students to take turns interacting with the set by both directing the scenarios within the set, and being the performers- they were both behind and in front of the lens if they wished. The final series of images blur the boundary between fiction and reality.

For more information, check out the PS77 Brooklyn Art News Blog.