Werkzeug Wahrnehmung (Perception as a Tool)

Werkzeug Wahrnehmung (Perception as a Tool), experimental art mediation walk at 6th Berlin Biennale by Birgit auf der Lauer, Jovana Komnenić, Silja Korn, Anja Winter and Dirk Sorge, 2010

Perception as a Tool was a moderated walk through the 6th Berlin Biennial exhibition of contemporary art. It took visitors through the exhibition and its surrounding in the public space. The concept of the walk made reference to the curatorial idea of the exhibition, but reacted to it in a participatory and playful way. The curator Kathrin Rhomberg posed questions about reality. She asked the audience: „Do you believe in reality?“

Our idea was to test the senses of the participants on the walk. To examine together how different perceptions convey different information, how they consciously and unconsciously connect with diverse memories and produce meaning in that way. In that sense, our focus was on the individuality of perception, on acceptance of diversity, and on the exchange within the group.

Another potential we saw was the possibility to focus on hidden or invisible stories in the surrounding of the exhibition.

BODY BILDER

BODY ↔ BILDER, workshop and exhibition between seeing and touching by Jovana Komnenić and Dirk Sorge, Schillerpalais, Berlin, 2013

In this workshop the participants built tactile pictures that are not flat, but have a relief surface and are supposed to be touched – not seen. The pictures were exhibited in a completely dark room and thus became invisible for the entire audience. It may seem strange to call them „pictures“, since they are not to be seen at all, but they are not sculptures either, they exist between the two-dimensional and three-dimensional realms.

In the exhibition we learned a lot about the mechanisms of the visual art system and the conventions that rule it. For touching a picture and following a line with your finger, you usually need much more time than you need when looking at it. When touching a picture, it is most suitable to only have one person standing in front of it. These two differences forced the audience of the exhibition to slow down in the dark room.

Not every picture could be recognized in the sense that it displayed concrete objects. Many were abstract and the process of touching itself was the subject of the art work.

For the sighted visitors it was an important experience to use their sense of touch. This sense is used a lot in everyday situations, but most of the time it happens without paying attention to it.

Netzwerk für Zugänglichkeit in Kunst und Kultur